Better than the cure

The New York Times is on another yoga binge, putting out stories on Ana Forrest’s niche appeal and former Cornell basketball players doing yoga during off-season, to mention the most recent ones. Jane Brody has a column about Ancient Moves for Orthopedic Problems mentioning the work of Loren Fishman, a physiatrist — a specialist in physical and rehabilitative medicine affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia hospital. I’ve already used the modified triangle headstand posture to get my shoulders aligned. His longer referenced article is available (PDF, 1.76 mb) from a special issue of Topics of Geriatric Rehabilitation (April/June 2011 – Volume 27 – Issue 2, pp. 93-166) on yoga as therapy.

I was even more struck by what Fishman writes in the Foreword of the special issue:

There are few therapies that boast about their side effects. Both medicine and surgery are undertaken because there is a favorable cost-benefit or risk-benefit ratio. The 2 (sic) are placed on opposite sides of the balance of good judgment. In yoga, the side-effects, irrelevant to the actual reasons for its initial adoption, may turn out to be more to the practitioner’s advantage than the primary therapeutic effect! Almost any style of yoga brings with it reduced blood pressure, less obesity, and less back pain, improved range of motion, safe strengthening, reduced asthma and reduced anxiety, better recovery after surgery and chemotherapy and almost stunningly low cost.

Fishman is no stranger to yoga: he practiced in India for three years before going to medical school and has co-authored books on Yoga Therapy. He has a website on sciatica and has several audios of conversations and courses on YogaU.com.