Hip abductor meltdown

With all the web chattering about how yoga can hurt your body (or not), it was only appropriate that I get to experience it first hand.

Graphic: hip abductorsOn Monday, in Jessica Apo’s vinyasa flow class at Thrive Yoga, I was in Extended Side Angle Pose (Utthita Parsvakonasana) with the full bind (under my top hand reaching behind my back and graspoing my bottom hand under my leg). It was the first time I had been able to do the bind since coming back from my knee injury (2009). I could clasp my hands without straining and fumbling to connect my hands (or using a strap); usually I just stick with half bind. In my massage therapy session with Howard Rontal a few days before, we had been working on loosening my shoulders and arms so that probably contributed to the change.

Doing the pose on the right side, I discovered the freedom in my shoulders, and even transitioned towards Bird of Paradise (Svarga Dvijasana), but did not come up to the one-leg balance because I didn’t want to risk an unsteady pose. On the left side, I decided to keep it simple and really sink into the pose, exploring how my body felt with this new range of movement. But the success with the bind that night probably took me into uncharted territory for the rest of my body, especially my core and lower back. When I released the bind to exit the pose, I felt a muscle spasm in my lower core — lower back (left side), groin, left hamstring. It was as if I had been hit by a stun gun. I rested in child’s pose. I did not feel any lasting pain so I continued with the class, modifying or skipping any pose that might overexerted my back.

I didn’t feel the injury at all during the next day or while doing my simple desk yoga. However, I tested my lower back in malasana, going deep into my hips, feet flat on the floor, and releasing my lower back. The injury flares up with a vengeance. I had to fall over on my side to get out of the pose because I could not lift up without severe pain.

That experience made me cancel any yoga classes for the rest of the week and call Howard. He managed to fit me in on Saturday for an emergency session. We spent the session working on the hip flexors and lower core. I am really fortunate that I have a therapist who already knows my  body and where my knots are tied. We had an interesting exchange in which he would apply some strokes and then I would test out how my body felt, giving him feedback, and then we’d go back on the table for additional work.

I actually felt more muscular aches and fatigue after the session. Oddly enough, I felt the pain on both sides evenly, as opposed to just the left.

Today I feel fine, a little stiff, but I will hold off on a class until tomorrow.