10 things I got out of 40-day renewal

I participated in the 40-day renewal program at Thrive Yoga, which ended on February 11. I did not have a chance to comment on my participation but I did want to record some take aways. It was my second time and I was determined to take it mindfully. Indeed, I had to take it slower because it took me the first four weeks to get back into shape.

  1. My blood pressure went down by 15-20 points by the end. In early January, I had been caught by surprise when the nurse at work measured my blood pressure and found it over 135/85. I had never had blood pressure issues before, but stress had started to take a toll.
  2. My weight dropped, ending up closer to 200 pounds, than 210 pounds at the start. I can’t give precise numbers because, as with most people, my weight tends to swing by 2-4 pounds, depending on the time of day, birthday cakes, and health. Since my parents’ deaths two years, I’ve noticed how my weight had gradually increased, until it plateaued just below the 210-pound mark so all I needed was an illness or life style change to push my weight up even more.
  3. By the end, in savasana (corpse pose), I noticed that my thighs and calves rested on the ground. Previously, my hip joints were well off the mat and made it impossible to rest all my legs on the ground. In fact, I can remember having problems with my heels because they were bearing much of the weight of my legs. That change signaled that there had been a shift in the tilt of my hips, along with a major realignment of the muscles descending from my core to my legs.
  4. Since I started in bad physical shape, I was trapped in a dead-end: I couldn’t boost my yoga practice because I did not have the strength or stamina to go full bore in a normal vinyasa class; I frequently sought relief in child’s pose. I didn’t want to force myself because I had injured myself before from over-efforting. I couldn’t fit some aerobic exercise at my fitness club because I did not have the spare time—and the time required for meditation went up each week. I ended up developing a routine in my workplace: every time, I needed to go to the restroom or take a break, I went to the basement and then climbed the nine flights of stairs up to my office cubicle. It only takes five minutes, but done 3-5 times a day, it allowed me to improve my strength. I also tried to do some of my desk work standing up, instead of sitting. These changes probably had a lot to do with my improved blood pressure and weight. But it was the 40-day renewal that made me focus on how fit I was. I couldn’t brush it off as something insignificant or passing.
  5. Because of the conditioning and injury issues, I had to think of myself as a beginner, but with the advantage that I had already learned the poses. I did not have to obsess about getting perfect alignment. I could just focus on being in the asana. I had less preference for which instructor was giving the class or at what level. I was adapting the rigors of the class to my own body’s needs.
  6. I avoided any pose that might injure me because I felt as if I was learning to handle my body all over again. My hips seemed especially problematic, which affect the stability of my spine and my balance. I did not go into binds, which are kind of icing on top of an asana or escalate a pose from its basic form to a more advanced variation.
  7. Coming back from injury or a long layoff gives a fresh perspective on the body and practice. I paid as much attention to where my body felt numb as I did to where I was fully aware. My proprioception has taken a major hit from my peripheral neuropathy. I found that some poses provoked numbness in my feet. It’s hard to single out which ones because I am usually moving through the sequence of a vinyasa when the numbness happens, and it usually dissipates with a little time. Indeed, restorative poses and hip stretches are the best medicine in the evening to relieve symptoms to let me sleep.
  8. I discovered far more flexibility than I had had: deeper forward folds, more space and movement between my shoulder girdle.
  9. The hardest part of the 40-day renewal was maintaining discipline in the meditation practice. It is so hard to be still in my own skin and life. And when I settle down in the evening for my transition routine, it’s so easy to slip into sleep so I doubt the quality of my meditation at that time.
  10. By the end of the renewal program, I was back to where I felt I could participate in a vinyasa class without undue distress. But it will take time and persistence to generate additional shifts in my well being because you can’t flip a switch to change the body or the mind.

Clarification: I did not want to let this post slip beyond the end of February. I’ve found it so hard to find time to write here, and I hate the thought of letting an entire month go by without an entry. Guilt is not the best motivator, but sometimes I just need a kick in the pants.